Imran aus Bangladesch

Asia

The Salvation Army supports projects in a total of five countries in Asia, improving the quality of life of around 50,000 people. 

Our projects in Asia

The Salvation Army supports projects in a total of five countries in Asia, improving the quality of life of around 50,000 people. Its focal points are healthcare and the improvement of livelihood. Microcredit helps people make the transition into the labour market and to secure their income. In selected communities, the Salvation Army works in close collaboration with the local population to improve urgently needed infrastructure such as healthcare provision. In the Philippines, it works to support chil-dren and young people in need as they make their way towards adulthood.

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

Offering hope to leprosy patients

From leprosy to a dignified life with his own income: this is the story of Parvez, from Bangladesh.

A Salvation Army project in Bangladesh is supporting people suffering from leprosy. Leprosy patients receive tools such as special shoes or walking aids and can even do vocational and further training courses. Because of their illness, they are often barred from taking part in such activities. Thanks to microloans like the one Parvez received for his rickshaw, leprosy patients are once again able to care for themselves and their families.

The Salvation Army works to build bridges between leprosy patients and the community, helping them to regain their sense of dignity. Support groups give leprosy sufferers a voice, allowing them to explain their illness to the local population and raise awareness about their needs.

You can read Parvez’s story in the picture gallery. Once a leprosy patient, today he lives a dignified life thanks to the project and can provide for his family.

 

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

The story of Parvez, from Bangladesh.

“In order to look for work, I was forced to leave the little village I lived in. But even in the capital, Dhaka, I had no luck. My hands and feet are so severely afflicted by my illness that I can hardly use them. At the age of 34, I already felt like an old man. My village didn’t want me any more – I was an outcast and people avoided me.”

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

The story of Parvez, from Bangladesh.

“Today I know that my illness is called leprosy, and that it is gradually crippling me. Leprosy forced me onto the streets to beg for money. I was driven by just one thing: providing for my wife and daughter. But I couldn’t make ends meet. I felt worthless and couldn’t see a way out – until a stranger spoke to me on the street one day.”

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

“The new shoes gave me back my hope”

“He told me that he had once suffered from leprosy too. Back then, he had received help at the Salvation Army clinic. I finally had a glimmer of hope! And the man even offered to take me to this clinic. When I arrived, the Salvation Army gave me a warm welcome. I was examined immediately and began therapy. I also finally received some shoes that fit me – quite a relief for my feet!”

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

“The new shoes gave me back my hope”

“Day by day, I built up hope again and learned how to live with my illness. The Salvation Army showed me how I could start working again in spite of my limitations. Thanks to a microloan I received to help me start out, I was able to buy a rickshaw. And that’s how my business came about – I rent out the rickshaw. I can finally buy food for my family and even pay my daughter’s school fees.”

Parvez aus Bangladesch erhielt Hilfe von der Heilsarmee

“I want to give other people courage”

“I am happy that I can now help other people too. There is a support group for leprosy patients that is part of the Salvation Army project in Dhaka. In this group, I talk about my experiences and how I live today. I want to give other people courage by telling my story, because leprosy sufferers are often afraid of having themselves examined and of being marginalised. I want to change all that!”